Sheeps and Hogs Going To The Pasture: Fiddle Lesson with Craig Judelman

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“Sheeps and Hogs Going to the Pasture” is a fun tune that was played and recorded by Kentucky fiddler Buddy Thomas (1934-1974). It’s played in the key of G out of standard tuning: GDAE. The tune is also commonly known as “Sheeps and Hogs Walking Through the Pasture” and “Sheeps and Hogs Going out to Pasture.” The similarly named tune “Hogs and Sheep Going to the Pasture” played by Burl Hammons out of cross A (AEAE) may be distantly related.

Craig Judelman teaches how to play Thomas’ version of the tune with special emphasis on the bowing, especially how to use down bows on the downbeats to maintain the danceable rhythm strong. He also shows a few variations to give the tune some more variety.

For more inspiration, listen to one of the source recordings of Buddy Thomas playing the tune:

Chords

The chords to the tune are somewhat less straightforward. Judelman plays with these chords:

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A:
G D / / G D / G
G D / / G D / G

B:
G / D / C / D G
G / D / C / D G

But recorded versions of Buddy Thomas have other chord changes. In one, with Dave Spilkia and Ray Alden the guitar plays:

A:
G / / / G / D G
G / / / G / D G

B:
G E / / / / / G
G E / / / / / G

While on the Kitty Puss recording the guitar plays a different set of chords for the B part:

B:
D / / / E / G /
D / / / E / D G


1 COMMENT

  1. Nice job both fiddling and teaching the tune. As a fiddler /guitar player, I hear Gs and Ds in part A in slightly different places than your guitarist but nothing untoward 🙂 I “hear” an Em in part B, too.

    Somewhat like this
    part B

    G / Em / D / C | G / Em / D / C
    G / Em / D / C | G / / / D G
    Vive la difference! Thanks
    Paul H

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